Tag Archives: Aquarius

Sculptor (The sculptor)

The Sculptor is a southern constellation of dim stars that does not rise very high in the sky. It is located south of a point half way between Aquarius and Cetus, and can only be seen from October through January, reaching its highest nightfall ascension in early December. The most notable characteristic of this constellation is that it contains the southern pole of the Milky Way Galaxy. The implication of this is that an observer is looking out of the galactic plane, instead of through its long axis as when observing the Milky Way. This explains why there are fewer stars in this region of the sky.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sculptor_(constellation)

IAU Sculptor chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Sculptor chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Piscis Austrinus (The southern fish)

Piscis AustrinusPiscis Austrinus, the southern fish, never rises very high above the southern horizon from our northern hemisphere location. It is situated below a point between Capricornus and Aquarius, and it reaches its highest nightfall ascension in October. In a light-polluted sky, 1st magnitude Fomalhaut might be the only star visible to the unaided eye. This constellation is related to one of the 48 constellations cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piscis_Austrinus

IAU Piscis Austrinus chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Piscis Austrinus chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Cetus (A sea monster in Greek mythology)

CetusCetus, the Greek mythological sea monster, is a large southern constellation on the celestial equator, and one of the 48 constellations cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy. It is accompanied by other water constellations – Pisces, Aquarius and Eridanus. Its head is nestled among three zodiacal constellations: Taurus, Aries and Pisces. Its body is south (below) Pisces, and is flanked by Aquarius and Eridanus. Cetus’ close proximity to the ecliptic means that the Moon, planets and asteroids occasionally pass through this constellation. Cetus is placed highest in the sky at nightfall in December.

Cetus is home to one Messier object, M77, a striking face-on spiral galaxy. Among Cetus’ stars is an unusual variable star, the disappearing  one, or Mira (Omicron Ceti). This star’s high variability from 3rd magnitude to 10th magnitude means that it disappears from view when it dips below 5th or 6th magnitude. Cetus’ brightest star Menkar (Alpha Ceti) marks the sea monster’s nose.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cetus

IAU Cetus chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Cetus chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Aquarius (The water bearer)

Constellation AquariusAquarius, the water bearer, is a rather dim and nondescript zodiacal constellation. This southern constellation was cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy. It is located in a region known to  the ancients as “the sea” because several water constellations, to include Capricornus (the sea goat), Piscis Austrinis (the fish), Pisces (the fishes), and Cetus (the sea monster) are gathered there. It is situated on the ecliptic between Capricornus and Pisces, and is just south of the Great Square of Pegasus. Aquarius reaches its highest nightfall ascension in November. Three globular star clusters, M2, M72 and M73 are the only Messier objects found in this constellation. The Eta Aquariids is the strongest meteor shower radiating from Aquarius, peaking at about 35 meteors per hour between May 5th and 6th.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquarius_(constellation)

IAU Aquarius chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), January 27, 1997.
IAU Aquarius chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), January 27, 1997.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net