Tag Archives: Gemini

Monoceros (The unicorn)

MonocerosCCThe unicorn is a dim equatorial constellation that is in very close proximity to several major constellations that steal the show in the region of the sky. Monoceros is south of Canis Minor and Gemini, to the left of Orion, and north of Canis Major, and reaches its highest nightfall ascension in March. There is one Messier object, M50, and four named deep space objects: Rosette Nebula (NGC 2237, 2238, 2239, and 2246), the Christmas Tree Cluster (NGC 2264), the Cone Nebula (NGC 2264), and Hubble’s Nebula (NGC 2261).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monoceros

IAU Monoceros chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Monoceros chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Canis Minor (The lesser dog)

Canis MinorCanis Minor is the lesser dog that follows the great hunter, Orion. This constellation was one of the 48 constellations cataloged by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy that remains among the 88 modern constellations. This small, 71st-largest constellation is best seen in March, and is located east of Orion, south of Gemini, and northeast of Canis Major, the greater dog that follows Orion. Its brightest stars are Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris) and Gomeisa (Beta Canis Minoris). This constellation contains the Canis-Minorids meteor shower, which lasts from 4-15 December, and peaks over the nights of 10 and 11 December. The Milky Way runs through this constellation, but it contains no Messier objects.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canis_Minor

610px-Canis_Minor_IAU.svg (1)
IAU Canis Minor Chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott & Rick Fienberg), June 4, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Lynx (The lynx)

This faint, northern circumpolar constellation is best seen in March. It is so named because lynx-like vision is required to see its faint stars. Also, it represents the long, stretched out body of a lynx. This 28th-largest constellation is located between the Big Dipper, Pollux and Castor of Gemini, and Auriga.  Its only named star is Alsciaukat, which is Arabic for thorn. This constellation’s most notable deep sky object, the Intergalactic Tramp (NGC 2419), is the globular cluster of stars most distant from Earth. The Lynx reaches its highest nightfall ascension in March.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynx_(constellation)

IAU Lynx chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Geminids Meteor Shower – December 13-14, 2014

Look for this meteor shower just before midnight on these two nights. There is a good chance of seeing a hundred or more meteors per hour! The radiant (the apparent point of origin) is in the constellation Gemini, which will be high overhead as midnight approaches. Be sure to get some observing in before the Moon rises at about 11pm and midnight on these two nights.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geminids

Cancer (The crab)

CancerCC_croppedCancer, the crab, is a zodiacal constellation of rather dim stars that can be difficult to see in light polluted skies. It is one of the 48 constellations cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy. Cancer is located on the ecliptic, half way between Pollux in Gemini and Regulus in Leo, and is highest in the sky at nightfall in March. If Cancer’s stars are not visible, try using binoculars, and then look again once the various stars in the constellation have been located. Cancer is home to two Messier objects, M44 (the Beehive Cluster, or Praesepe) and M67.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cancer_(constellation)

IAU Cancer chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 4, 2011.
IAU Cancer chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 4, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Gemini (The twins)

Constellation GeminiGemini, the twins, is a zodiacal constellation that was also one of the 48 constellations cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy that remain among the 88 modern constellations. This constellation located above Orion’s left shoulder, and between Taurus and Cancer on the ecliptic. It is highest in the sky at nightfall in March, and is quickly identified by two rather bright stars of approximately equal brightness, Castor and Pollux, that represent each of the Gemini twins. The ecliptic reaches its northernmost separation from the celestial equator in Gemini, and the Sun’s arrival at this point marks the Summer Solstice.  The annual Geminids is a prominent annual meteor shower that peaks between December 13th and 14th. Only one Messier object, M35, is located in Gemini.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_(constellation)

IAU Gemini chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Gemini chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net