Tag Archives: June

Lupus (The wolf)

Constellation LupusLupus, the wolf, is one of the 48 constellations cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy that remain among the 88 modern constellations defined by the International Astronomical Union. It is a southern constellation that is so far south that it barely peeks above the horizon in June and July for viewers at 40-degree north locations. It is situated beneath the scales of Libra, and to the right of Scorpius. There are no Messier objects in Lupus, and the several NGC objects located there are difficult for northern observers because of the constellation’s low placement on the horizon.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lupus_(constellation)

IAU Lupus chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011..
IAU Lupus chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011..

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Libra (The scales)

Constellation LibraLibra, the scales, is a small zodiacal constellation of  rather dim stars that was cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy. It is located on the ecliptic between Virgo and Scorpius, and is to the south of Ophiuchus. This southern constellation, which never rises very far above the horizon, reaches its highest nightfall ascension in June. Its brightest star, Zubenelgenubi, is just brighter then 3rd magnitude, which can be a challenge to see in some light-polluted urban skies.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libra_(constellation)

IAU Libra chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Libra chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Boötes (The herdsman or plowman)

BootesBoötes is a bright and distinct northern constellation that is one of the 48 constellations cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy. It can be found by looking south of Draco, lying between Hercules and Ursa Major. It is also found by following the curve of the Big Dipper’s handle southward and away from the bowl to the bright star Arcturus. Sometimes the phrase “arc to Arcturus” is used to describe this approach to locating it. Boötes reaches its highest nightfall ascension in June. Arcturus is the fourth brightest star in the night sky, and Boötes is home to many other bright stars, including eight above the fourth magnitude and an additional 21 above the fifth magnitude, making a total of 29 stars easily visible to the naked eye.

There are no Messier objects located in Boötes, but several NGC galaxies can be found with a telescope. The radiant of the Quadrantids meteor shower, which displays about 100 meteors per hour when it peaks over January 3rd and 4th, is located between Bootes’ head and the end of Ursa Major’s tail.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bootes_(constellation)

IAU Bootes chart, IAU and Sky  Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick fienberg), June 4, 2011.

IAU Bootes chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 4, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Ursa Minor (The lesser bear)

320px-UrsaMinorCCSimilar to Ursa Major, which contains the Big Dipper asterism, Ursa Minor contains another recognizable asterism that is often called the Little Dipper. Some of the dimmer dipper stars can be difficult to locate in city skies, and the other stars forming the bear might be impossible to see. Polaris, the constellation’s brightest star, is found at the end of the bear’s tail, or at the end of the dipper handle. This star is thought by some to be significant because it is the brightest star in the sky, which is incorrect – Sirius in Canis Major is actually the brightest star in all of the night sky. An observer can verify that Polaris is not the brightest star in the sky by locating it, and comparing it with other stars in the rest of the sky. Polaris can be located by using the Big Dipper’s pointer stars, the two stars at the end of the dipper bowl away from the handle, and drawing an imaginary line upwards from the top of the bowl.

Ursa Minor is the 56th-largest constellation, and one of the 48 constellations cataloged by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy that remain among the 88 modern constellations. There are no Messier objects in this constellation.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ursa_Minor_(constellation)

IAU Ursa Minor Chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net