Tag Archives: Libra

Lupus (The wolf)

Constellation LupusLupus, the wolf, is one of the 48 constellations cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy that remain among the 88 modern constellations defined by the International Astronomical Union. It is a southern constellation that is so far south that it barely peeks above the horizon in June and July for viewers at 40-degree north locations. It is situated beneath the scales of Libra, and to the right of Scorpius. There are no Messier objects in Lupus, and the several NGC objects located there are difficult for northern observers because of the constellation’s low placement on the horizon.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lupus_(constellation)

IAU Lupus chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011..
IAU Lupus chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011..

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Hydra (The water snake)

Hydra, SextansHydra is the largest of the 88 modern constellations, and was one of the 48 constellations cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy. Hydra’s head lies at a point about halfway between Procyon in Canis Minor and Regulus in Leo. From there, it snakes (pun intended) south and eastward below Leo and Virgo, sharing two stars with Crater along the way, before ending just below the right scale of Libra. Hydra’s head reaches its highest nightfall ascension in March, but the tail does not reach that point until three months later in June. The best over all view of Hydra is in late April. Hydra is home to three Messier objects: M83 (the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy), M68 (a globular star cluster), and M48 (an open star cluster).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydra_(constellation)

IAU Hydra chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Hydra chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Scorpius (The scorpion)

Constellation ScorpiusScorpius is perhaps the most beautiful of the zodiacal constellations. This southern constellation is located on the ecliptic between Libra and Sagittarius and is situated south of Ophiuchus. Antares (Alpha Scorpii), the reddish 1st magnitude star might first catch the observers attention. Then look for the remainder of the constellation which includes a distinct head, long slender body, curling tail, and stinger of a scorpion. Even though Sagittarius is on the lowest point of the ecliptic, Scorpius is the southernmost of the zodiacal constellations, which tends to leave the tail hanging below the treeline for us northern latitude observers. Southbound travelers in July, which is when Scorpius reaches its highest nightfall ascension, should make it a point to observe this very pretty constellation.

Scorpius’ location on the Milky way makes it home for many deep sky objects, such as the Butterfly Cluster (M6) and the Ptolemy Cluster (M7). Other objects cataloged by Charles Messier include globular clusters M4 and M80.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scorpius

IAU Scorpius chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine, 5 June 2011.
IAU Scorpius chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), 5 June 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014
jim@jrjohnson.net

Libra (The scales)

Constellation LibraLibra, the scales, is a small zodiacal constellation of  rather dim stars that was cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy. It is located on the ecliptic between Virgo and Scorpius, and is to the south of Ophiuchus. This southern constellation, which never rises very far above the horizon, reaches its highest nightfall ascension in June. Its brightest star, Zubenelgenubi, is just brighter then 3rd magnitude, which can be a challenge to see in some light-polluted urban skies.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libra_(constellation)

IAU Libra chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Libra chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Virgo (The virgin)

Constellation VirgoVirgo, the virgin, is one of the zodiacal constellations,  is one of the 48 constellations cataloged by 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy, and is the 2nd largest constellation in the sky. It can be found at is highest point in the sky at nightfall in March. Virgo is located on the ecliptic, flanked by Leo and Libra. It can also be found by following the arc of the Big Dipper’s handle through Arcturus in Bootes to Spica (Alpha Virginis), Virgo’s brightest star. Some of Virgo’s remaining stars can be difficult to see in light-polluted urban skies because this is not a particularly bright constellation. Within Virgo is one of the two points where the ecliptic intersects the celestial equator.  The moment of the Sun’s southward crossing of the celestial equator as it moves along the ecliptic is the Autumnal Equinox, which marks the first day of Fall.

The Virgo Cluster is a very large scale object spanning about eight degrees and containing 1,300 or more individual galaxies. The cluster is centered in Virgo, and extends northward into Coma Berenices. The member galaxies that were cataloged by Charles Messier are M49, M58, M59, M60, M61, M84, M86, M87, M89, and M90. Many other galaxies in this cluster have NGC designations. The Sombrero Galaxy, M104, is a very unusual galaxy in Virgo that is not a member of the Virgo Cluster.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgo_(constellation)

IAU Virgo chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Virgo chart, Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.