Tag Archives: Sculptor

Fornax (The furnace)

Constellation FornaxFornax, the furnace, is a southern constellation that barely comes into view for observers at 40-degrees north latitude. It is south of Cetus, and flanked by Eridanus and Sculptor. It reaches its highest point in the sky at nightfall in January, but its dim stars and placement at only ten degrees above the horizon make this a very challenging constellation. The view beyond Fornax’s foreground stars is out of the plane of the Milky Way Galaxy. This accounts for the paucity of visible stars in this region, and is why it was chosen for one of the Hubble Deep Field photographs. This also explains why a relatively large number of the dwarf galaxies in the Milky Way’s galactic halo can be found in this direction with a telescope.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fornax

IAU Fornax chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Fornax chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Phoenix (The mythical Phoenix)

Constellation PhoenixMythical Phoenix is very low and dim southern constellation that is challenging to locate from northern latitudes. Find it by drawing a line southward from Pisces through Cetus and Sculptor. Because it is located so far south, it is only visible at its highest nightfall ascension in December, and perhaps its brightest star, Ankaa (Alpha Phoenicis) will be the only star visible through the haze on the horizon. Two recently-discovered galaxy clusters, Phoenix and El Gordo, are among the largest objects in the visible universe.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_(constellation)

IAU Phoenix chart, IAU and Sky Telescope magazine, Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg, June 5, 2011.
IAU Phoenix chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net

Sculptor (The sculptor)

The Sculptor is a southern constellation of dim stars that does not rise very high in the sky. It is located south of a point half way between Aquarius and Cetus, and can only be seen from October through January, reaching its highest nightfall ascension in early December. The most notable characteristic of this constellation is that it contains the southern pole of the Milky Way Galaxy. The implication of this is that an observer is looking out of the galactic plane, instead of through its long axis as when observing the Milky Way. This explains why there are fewer stars in this region of the sky.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sculptor_(constellation)

IAU Sculptor chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.
IAU Sculptor chart, IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott and Rick Fienberg), June 5, 2011.

© James R. Johnson, 2014.
jim@jrjohnson.net